Marlboro City

by Michael Brockington

Copyright © 1993 Michael Brockington



1.  EXT.  SCULLY'S PHONE BOOTH - NIGHT

Black screen.  Credits fade in and out during the following 
exchange, but the screen remains dark.    Foreground,  we hear 
the tuneless BEEPING of a telephone number being dialed, 
RINGING once, twice...

		RICKI  (V.O.)
	Hello?

		SCULLY  (V.O.)
	Ricki, honey, this is me.  How 
	you been?

		RICKI  (V.O.)
	Jake?  Long time, no hear. 

		SCULLY  (V.O.)
	Hey, I been busy, but listen --

		RICKI  (V.O.)
	Two months you ain't called me.  
	I'm looking at my calendar, here: 
	it got  "dinner with jake" written 
	august 16.  Then it's got maybe  
	60 little white squares with 
	nothing but dentist appointments 
	and furnace repairmen.  Tell me 
	why that is, Jake.

		SCULLY  (V.O.)
	Look, sugar, I need --

		RICKI  (V.O.)
	You can't just talk me up like Rip 
	van Winkle, Jake, like no time gone 
	by.  Why the fuck ain't you called?

		SCULLY  (V.O.)
	What do you want me to tell you, 
	I'm a schmuck?  Fine.  I didn't 
	phone 'cause I'm a schmuck.  Feel 
	better?  You got my number, too, 
	honey --  and you ain't called me 
	either.  Now why is  that?

A pause: all we hear is a faint CRACKLE of static and the distant 
DISTORTED CROSSTALK of someone else's conversation.

		RICKI  (V.O.)
	Cause you a schmuck.

Sound of DISCONNECT, then the indifferent HUM of the dial tone.  
Fade in on SCULLY in a phone booth on a Vancouver sidestreet, 
first in a line of 4 or 5 pay phones.  He hangs up slowly.  Scully's a 
disbarred lawyer, a smooth talker with hightly developed body 
language.  His gestures have become so important to the rhythym 
of his speech that he can't turn them off even when he's on the 
phone where no-one can see them. 

		SCULLY
	Well thank-you for playing, 
	bachelorette number five.

There's a notebook in front of him, the page filled with names and 
phone numbers.  He takes a pen and crosses off 'Ricki Harker'.  
It's maybe the fourth name on the page -- hard to tell, because 
everything above it has also been crossed off.



2.   MAIN TITLE ON BLACK -- "Marlboro City"



3.  INT.  DEXTER'S GARAGE - NIGHT

DEXTER's in his early 50's.  He sits in his expensive car, in his dark garage, 
his seat tilted way back, eyes closed, maybe even asleep.  The car radio is 
on, dribbling country music.  The cellular phone in the car starts RINGING.  
Still reclining, Dexter reaches to answer it.  The car motor can be heard 
under the music, idling.



4.  EXT.  EMILY'S PHONE BOOTH - NIGHT

Scully picks up the phone again, INSERTS a  new quarter.  In the 
next booth EMILY is trying to light a cigarette, receiver cramped 
between shoulder and ear.  Emily's young, slightly punkish, trying 
to look dangerous and not doing a bad job.  Her clothes are 
covered with text, slogans, mostly hand-applied: fashion semiotics.  
Abruptly, she straightens, dropping her match. 

		EMILY
	Sandra,  this is Emily.  Pick up 
	the phone if you're there. 

5.  INT.  ATLANTA'S BEDROOM - NIGHT

The bed is a heap of multicolored blankets.  Curtains are drawn, 
but the windows are open, the breeze sometimes pushing fabric 
aside to let in city streetlight.  MUFFLED RINGING.

6.  EXT.  JEREMY'S PHONE BOOTH - NIGHT

Emily's cigarette is forgotten in her hand, unlit.  

		EMILY
	Don't tell me you're screening 
	your calls, now, like 
	BusinessBabe Barbie.

In the next booth down, JEREMY talks loudly, finger in one ear.  
He's an english teacher  from Calgary, in town for a convention, 
middle-aged more by choice than by years. 

		JEREMY
	Baker.  No -- Ba-a-a-ker.  Bee.  
	As in bumble.  After Ay, as in 
	apple, before Cee, as in...
	crouton.  Right, Bee.

He pauses, listening.  We can't hear the OPERATOR's words 
exactly, but we can catch her general TONE OF VOICE.



7.  INT.  SANDRA'S SQUAT - NIGHT

A phone attached to an answering machine sits on the floor.  No 
furniture.  The machine picks up after a half-aborted RING.

		SANDRA
	                   (on machine)
	This is 255-8391.  No-one can
	come to the phone right now.  If
	you need to get in touch...

		EMILY
	  (on phone, overlapping)	
	Sandra?  Don't piss around.  
	Pick up the phone...please.


8.  EXT.  HARLAN'S PHONE BOOTH - NIGHT

Jeremy has luggage stacked just outside his booth.  He keeps 
turning to check whether it's still there.

		JEREMY
	My  number?  I'm using a pay 
	phone, if--  OK, OK -- 862-9302. 
	Nine  three.  No, I'd love to hold.


In his early 20's, HARLAN wears a suit cut so sharp it could have 
been designed in a wind tunnel.  Crew cut hair, suspenders 
discreetly visible, leather tie that might just be made of human skin.
He's wearing a walkman, one earphone pushed aside so he can 
listen to the telephone.

		HARLAN
	I have  tried calling your office.  
	Been tagging your secretary
	all week long.  I just get tired 
	of the phone politics. Reminds 
	you of high school, doesn't it?  
	Who calls who, does she call 
	me, what if I don't call at all?

		DEXTER
	This is my day off, Mr...

		HARLAN
	Lemme explain you the birds and 
	the biz, then.  I'm an ad exec over 
	at Ess-Pee.  Worked on the 
	Arrivaderci Aroma deoderant
	campaign?  A few interesting 
	accounts, anyway,  but no killers, 
	so I figure why wait for the 
	headhunters to come to me?

		DEXTER
	Eight o'clock at night, you're gonna 
	ask me for a job?  My chance to 
	relax, maybe listen to some music?  

		HARLAN
	My head, on a silver plate. Like 
	Johnny Baptist, like Elvis. I got 
	the ideas and the moves, you 
	know?  Off with my head. Off 
	the top of my head.

Harlan chuckles, but the phone remains ominously silent.



9.  INT.  ATLANTA'S BEDROOM - NIGHT

The mound of blankets shifts a bit.  The RINGING stops, and we 
hear ATLANTA's voice from beneath the blankets.

		ATLANTA
	Morning, baby.   

A telephone cord runs under the covers.

		ATLANTA
	Well what time is  it?



10.  EXT  SCULLY'S PHONE BOOTH - NIGHT

Scully looks disreputable,  uncomfortable in his clothes: he's used 
to an expensive wardrobe, and doesn't know how to buy cheap 
without looking cheap.  He TAPS his pen, starting to get twitchy.


		SCULLY
	Eight o'clock.  You want to know 
	what day?

		ATLANTA
	I don't even know what time zone
	I'm in. 

		SCULLY
	Prime time, honey!  Business hours.



11.  INT.  ATLANTA'S BEDROOM - NIGHT

The blankets shift again, restless laundry.

		ATLANTA
	This is you, isn't it Scully?

		SCULLY
	Last time I checked.  Scully-baby,  baby.

Awake, now, ATLANTA surfaces from beneath the covers. 

		ATLANTA
	Fuck, can't we just pretend you 
	called and got my machine?  
	Leave your number, I'll get   
	back?  Real soon.

		SCULLY
	If I wanted to talk to a machine I'd  
	call my brother.  Atlanta, sweetie,
	I need a favour:  what ever 
	happened  to forgive and forget?


		ATLANTA
	I'm working on the forgetting 
	part first.

		SCULLY
	I've been out of town!  What are
	you gonna do, shoot me in the
	head?  You know I love you,
	you adorable bitch.

		ATLANTA
	   (almost by reflex)
	Go fuck yourself with a 
	sandpaper dildo, you suckass
	blowjob, you testicle!  I ain't heard
	shit from you since your marriage
	broke up; now you call, and it's
	sweetie pie this and honey bitch 
	that.  Don't tell me you and your 
	wife are back together.

		SCULLY
	Ex!  Ex-wife!

		ATLANTA
	    (sad and amused)
	Oh, Jacob!  
	        (beat)
	Tell you what -- I'm hanging up 
	right  now.  You call me back, 
	quick's you can.



12.  EXT.  SCULLY'S PHONE BOOTH - NIGHT.

DISCONNECT and DIAL TONE.  Muttering under his breath, 
Scully grabs another quarter, checks his phone book, DIALS 
again.  Atlanta doesn't even give it a full RING.

		SCULLY
	Okay?  So now you owe me a quarter.

		ATLANTA
	15 seconds, Scully!  Bullshit, you 
	love me. You don't even have my 
	number memorized.  No more 
	freebies, sweetness -- you want 
	the details on what a sorry fuck 
	you are, call the 900 number like 
	anybody else, cause I sure ain't 
	gonna be telling you for a quarter.	

13.  INT.  DEXTER'S GARAGE - NIGHT

		HARLAN
	  (getting carried away)
	Let me tell ya, I got the buzz.  
	Birds and the buzz, like a 
	black'n'decker power saw.  
	Cutting edge, yeah?

Dexter switches off the radio.  Engine noise fills in the gap.

		DEXTER
	Jesus.  How's your coliform count?

		HARLAN
	Yeah!  Warhol of the bullshit-artists, 
	my old man used to tell me.  

		DEXTER
	Our firm is more interested in 
	bullshit scientists, 'Andy' --
	                      
Dexter cuts himself off, struck by some thought.



14.  INT.  SANDRA'S SQUAT - NIGHT

		SANDRA
	      (on machine)
	If you need to get in touch with me, 	
	leave a message at  the tone.  If you 
	want to talk to Emily, check directory 
	assistance for her new number.



15.  CLOSE-UP - SCULLY'S NOTE BOOK

Scully draws a line through the name "Atlanta Sharp" as he waits 
for the next contestant to pick up her phone.



16.  EXT.  JEREMY'S PHONE BOOTH - NIGHT

		JEREMY
	Hello!  685-3224, thank  you.  
	Hang on -- address too, please.
	Address!  No, there's no point 
	my phoning, they'll still be at work.  

17.  INT.  DEXTER'S GARAGE - NIGHT

Dexter raises his seat from reclining position.

		DEXTER
	'Warhol?'  You did say 'Warhol'?



18.  EXT.  HARLAN'S PHONE BOOTH - NIGHT

Harlan closes his eyes, slumps.  He knows the jig is up.  We can 
hear Jeremy yelling in the next booth:

		JEREMY (V.O.)
	Whuuh!  Work!  I said they'll be at work!



19.  INT.  DEXTER'S GARAGE - NIGHT

		DEXTER
	Waitaminute -- Harlan!   Is that you?

		HARLAN
	(dropping his voice about half-an-octave
	 from it's previous register.)
	Don't hang up, Pop.

		DEXTER
	How in hell did you get my number?



20.  EXT.  JEREMY'S PHONE BOOTH - NIGHT
	
		JEREMY
	I could get it out of a fucking phone 
	book, if the fucking phone books 
	were up to date.



21.  EXT.  HARLAN'S PHONE BOOTH - NIGHT

We can see MARIA approaching in the background.  She's a 
panhandler, attired in unisex clothes: value-village chic . 

		DEXTER
	So that's what you call 'tagging' my
	secretary?

		HARLAN
	Well, she is an attractive woman.

		DEXTER
	      (exploding)
	Yah, I had noticed.



22.  EXT. SCULLY'S PHONE BOOTH - NIGHT

		SCULLY
	Aw, sweetie, don't be that way.  
	Didn't I tell you never pay attention 
	to anything I say in my sleep?

DISCONNECT and DIAL TONE, as the latest bachelorette hangs 
up.  Scully crosses off the name at the bottom of the page, leaving 
only  one -- "Jenny" -- in  the top margin, with no last name or 
number beside it.  Scully tears out the page.  The next one's blank.  
He crumples the paper, then thinks better of it, and smooths it out, 
grabs a quarter, and DIALS.

		SCULLY
	Be there.  Be there now, Jenny,
	sweetie, honey, come on!



23.  EXT.  HARLAN'S PHONE BOOTH - NIGHT

		DEXTER
	There's no more money, Harlan!  

Maria's casual trajectory brings her into range.  

		MARIA
	Spare change, Jack?  Any rusty
	old coin...?

Harlan mouths a silent, exagerrated "Fuck off!" at Maria.

		DEXTER
	I swear, the genius who thought up
	"Reach out and touch someone" 
	must have had you in mind.

		HARLAN
	       (to Dexter)
	I'm asking for a job,  Poppa, not a loan.

Maria continues up the line of telephones, approaching Jeremy.
 
		JEREMY
	Nobody pays you to take this kind 
	of abuse?  What kind do  you hire 
	yourself out for?  

 		MARIA
	      (to Jeremy)
	Spare change, buddy?

 		JEREMY
	      (to Maria)
	No thanks.
	     (into phone)
	Look, I'm willing to pay.  Just 
	tell me how much to deposit in 
	exchange for the address.
 
Maria moves on.  Emily is the next target.

		MARIA
	Spare a quarter, lady?
 
Emily stares at her silently, while over her phone we hear 
Sandra's answering machine emit a long BEEP. 
 


24.  INT.  SANDRA'S SQUAT - NIGHT

We just catch the end of the answering machine's BEEP.  It's quiet 
enough to hear the tape wheels WHIRRING around.
 
		MARIA
	  (faintly over phone)
	Can you help me out?  Quarter for a 
	cup of coffee?
 
CLICK of disconnect.  The tape wheels SNICK to a halt and the 
red light signalling new messages begins to flash.



25.  EXT.  SCULLY'S PHONE BOOTH - NIGHT
 
Scully's sweating, fiddling compulsively with a quarter as he talks.

		SCULLY
	I just wanted to know how you 
	were doing.


		JENNY
	How I'm doing.  Cut the shit, 
	Jake.  I lived with you long 
	enough to devlop antibodies.
	What are you after?

		MARIA
	      (to Scully)
	Spare a quarter, buddy?

Without thinking, Scully flips her the quarter he's playing with.

		SCULLY
	You never want to believe that 
	I care, do you Jen?

		MARIA
	You're in my will, man.


26.  INT - JENNY'S HOUSE - NIGHT.

		JENNY
	You were always the smooth one, 
	weren't you?  "No-Zits Jake": that's 
	what my Mom called you before 
	we got married.  Slick as plastic.

		SCULLY
	How is  your Mom?

		JENNY
	      (sweetly)
	She's dead Jake; she's still dead.
	Funny how that works.  I'm fine; 
	she's dead.  So it's been great 
	talking, but now I gotta go...
	   (suddenly violent)
	...you mouth, you sleazy nothing!

Jenny slams the receiver down.

	    (to phone, calmer)
	I gotta go.



27.  EXT.  SCULLY'S PHONE BOOTH - NIGHT.

		SCULLY
	Jenny...Jen?  You can't hang 
	me up!

Scully realizes he's talking to a dead line.  He starts digging in his 
pocket for another quarter.  No quarter.  He goes through his other 
pockets, pulling stuff out and piling it beside the phone: pennies 
and nickles, a key-ring with one lonely key, an empty pack of 
cigarettes.  Antacid tablets, a sheet of paper with scribbled notes, a 
pair of reading glasses, a film cannister -- various small pieces of a 
life.  Scully's trying to stay calm, but being calm doesn't help -- 
he's out of change, no quarters at all.  He SMACKS the glass in 
frustration, which draws Emily's attention.  Catching her eye, 
Scully ducks out of his booth and pokes his head into hers.

		SCULLY
	I ran out of change.  Could you...

He's not reaching her.  The opening of Sandra's MACHINE 
MESSAGE can be heard under his lines.

		SCULLY
	Just a quarter.  Important call.

They stare at one another.



28.  EXT.  JEREMY'S PHONE BOOTH - NIGHT

		JEREMY
	Right here on the front of the 
	phone it says, "411: Information."  
	Is that some kind of sick joke?  
	Information, you cow!  Let me
	spell that for you: that's 'Cee' -- 	
	as in ...'cow'  -- 

Scully pushes open the door to Jeremy's booth.  

		SCULLY
	Can you help me out --

Jeremy SLAMs down his phone.  He swings around belligerantly.

		JEREMY
	What the fuck do you  want!  
	People in this city!

He pushes roughly past Scully, grabs the strap for his luggage 
and starts dragging it away like some dead pet on a leash. Scully 
shrugs and checks the coin return slot, but no luck.  The pay 
phone RINGS.  Startled, Scully picks it up.  He doesn't even have 
a chance to say hello;  we still can't distinguish the individual 
words in the torrent of abuse, but the angry VOICE on the phone is 
clearly recognizable as the operator's.

29.  INT.  DEXTER'S GARAGE - NIGHT

		DEXTER
	I can't just snap my fingers.

		HARLAN
	Bullshit!  You got your nose so 
	far up Maynard's ass, you can't 
	tell your sinus congestion from 
	his constipation!  Whatever you 
	ask for, you got.  

		SCULLY
	   (faintly, over phone)
	Got a quarter, man?

		DEXTER
	No loans!



30.  EXT.  HARLAN'S PHONE BOOTH - NIGHT

		HARLAN
	      (to Scully)
	Bugger off, willya?

		DEXTER
	I'd be glad to.

		HARLAN
	Not you, Pop.

Maria has come up behind Scully, unseen.  She grabs Scully by 
the coat, pulls him away from Harlan so they're face to face.  The 
two conversations here proceed concurrently.

        HARLAN	                               MARIA
It's these tagteam panhandlers           This is my corner, man.
I'm  talking to.                         You're trespassing

         DEXTER                                SCULLY
Hey, maybe you can get a        	 Gimme a fucking break.  I gotta make a 
job with them .  You and that    	 call.  And hey, you got quarters!  Yeah, I bet 
secretary of mine...             	 you got a whole pocketful of change.
                                              
Maria pushes Scully away, starts moving back.

         HARLAN                                MARIA
For years you been telling me            You wanna make a call?  Try 911.
'get a job'.   Now you won't even       
help me out?              

Scully chases after Maria, who seems a little more nimble than previously.  
They vanish offscreen.

         	                               SCULLY   (V.O.)
          DEXTER                        What about that quarter I gave  you?
I'd like to find you something          I need my quarter back.  I can hear
Harlan, but the truth is, we            your pockets jingling!
just don't have any openings
right now. 

		HARLAN
	No shit, huh?  Me either -- but 
	that's because I'm getting fucked 
	up every available orifice.  No
	openings -- jesus, Poppa, don't
	give me this company-speak --
	talk like a human being for five
	minutes.



31.  INT.  DEXTER'S GARAGE - NIGHT

		DEXTER
	It's not that easy, Harlan!  You're 
	not qualified.  Being obnoxious
	and impossible to shut up are not
	enough.  But you can't see that,
	can you; you think you know it all, 
	don't  you?  You think you're Jesus   
	Christ with a fucking haircut.

		HARLAN
	I got  it in my blood, Poppa.  
	Remember this?  "My old man, he'd 
	hawk seawater in tiny bottles, 
	call it a vial of tears.  'We live 
	in this vial of tears,' he used 
	to say.  Five bucks an ounce.
	He'd bottle  freshwater and 
	sell it as angel tears."

		DEXTER
	"Angel's tears."  That old bastard.

		HARLAN
	I remember a lot of that stuff 
	about  grandpa.  

Dexter takes a moment to light up a cigarette.


		DEXTER
	Why now, Harlan?  What 
	changed your mind about
	getting into advertising?



32.  EXT.  HARLAN'S PHONE BOOTH - NIGHT

         	HARLAN
	I just decided I wanted to do 
	something productive with my life.
	        (beat)
	Let me tell you something, Poppa, 
	and this is a no-shit thing.  When 
	I was a kid you know what I 
	wanted more than anything almost 
	was to just talk to you one time
	without it feeling like a job interview.
	        (beat)
	But  maybe it works out, huh? 
	Maybe the practice pays off.



33.  INT.  DEXTER'S GARAGE - NIGHT

Dexter switches off the car ignition.  The garage goes silent.

		DEXTER
	How about I call you in a couple of days?

		HARLAN
	Poppa!  I love you!

		DEXTER
	       (Pleased)
	Bullshit-artist.



34.  EXT. HARLAN'S PHONE BOOTH - NIGHT

Harlan hangs up, steps away from the phone.  Scully enters frame, 
blocking his path.  Maria drifts into view at a distance, observing.

		SCULLY
	Look, pal -- I don't know you, I 
	don't mean to bother you -- it's 
	just very important I make this 
	call.  If you got dimes, nickles, 
	anything.

Harlan freezes for a moment, then relaxes and grins, fishing for 
change.

		HARLAN
	You ever notice how much easier 
	it is giving money to people who 
	don't look like they need it?

Maria takes a step closer to Harlan.

		MARIA
	Don't give him the quarter, man.

Surprised, Harlan turns to look at her.

		HARLAN
	What, he's not in the union?

		SCULLY
	Gimme the quarter.

Harlan turns back to Scully.

		MARIA
	I'm telling you, don't give him 
	that fucking quarter!

Harlan flips the quarter to Scully.  As Scully catches it Maria grabs 
a phone book from the nearest booth, steps up behind Harlan and 
whacks him over the head with it .  Harlan collapses onto Scully, 
who stands there, holding him up.

		SCULLY
	Jesus Fuck!

		MARIA
	Hey, I told  him. 

She reaches around, extracts Harlan's wallet, riffles through it.

	Help me stack him over here.  
	We can prop him up so it looks 
	like he's makin' a call.

		SCULLY
	Are you fucking insane?

		MARIA
	What's your problem, man?  
	C'mon -- you got  your money.

		
35.  INT.  SANDRA'S SQUAT - NIGHT

A cat wanders into the room, lonely, attracted to the voice on the 
machine.

		SANDRA
	      (on machine)
	No-one can come to the phone 
	right now. If you need to get in 
	touch with me, leave a message 
	at the tone.  If you need to get 
	in touch with Emily...



36.  EXT. EMILY'S PHONE BOOTH - NIGHT

Emily is quietly reciting the message along with the MACHINE.

		EMILY
	...check directory assistance for 
	her new number.  Emily, if that's 
	you, please hang up.  Don't 
	leave a message.  I'm sorry.



37.  EXT.  SCULLY'S PHONE BOOTH - NIGHT

Scully's shaking like a slot-machine junkie as he jacks his quarter 
into the phone and DIALS.   He's muttering to himself :

		SCULLY
	2...5...5...1789...fall of the Bastile,
	Jen.  I know you know it's me, so
	answer the damn phone, darling...

Scully TAPS out a frantic, erratic rhythm with his hands on any 
surface in reach.  The percussion attracts Emily's notice.  She 
looks over from her own booth, then away again.  Startled, Scully 
notices he's getting smears of blood on the glass, and tries to wipe 
his hands clean on his crumpled telephone list.  



38.  INT.  JENNY'S HOUSE - NIGHT.

Jenny is wearing a coat and hat now, watching her phone RING, 
as though afraid it might become more agressive -- rise up, 
perhaps, on spider legs and scuttle after her, should she leave.  
Reluctantly, she reaches for the receiver.

39.  EXT.  SCULLY'S PHONE BOOTH - NIGHT.

Scully launches straight in, no time spared for hellos.

		SCULLY
	Jenny!  You remember that argument 
	when we decided to go ahead with 
	the divorce?  About who would get 
	custody of the phone number?  I'm 
	glad it was you.  Now I can always
	remember your number.

		JENNY
	Jake.

		SCULLY
	And when I got my own phone I 
	only came up with 5 people to 
	give the new number to, anyway.

		JENNY
	Tell me what the fuck you want!



40.  EXT.  EMILY'S PHONE BOOTH - DAY

		EMIILY  
	  (duet with machine, singsong almost)
	I don't want to hear your voice.  
	I don't want to speak to you.  I'm 
	going to be gone this weekend;
	you can pick up the rest of your 
	stuff then.



41.  INT.  SANDRA'S SQUAT - NIGHT

The cat is PURRING, rubbing against the answering machine.

		SANDRA
	   (on machine, with Emily
	    echoing her in background)
	I don't think there's anything more to 
	say.  So hang up Emily -- hang up now 
	if you haven't already, and don't call back.

The machine signals that it's ready to record with a loud BEEP.  
Frightened by the noise, the cat runs from the room.


42.  EXT.  EMILY'S PHONE BOOTH - DAY

		EMILY
	Sandra?  Sandy?  I not sure what 
	to tell you.  I've been calling 5, 6 
	times a day, just to hear the sound 
	of your voice on this bullshit 
	machine.  But it hurts to hear you 
	say those things, and you know 
	every time it's just the same, 
	which means every time somehow 
	it's worse.  I don't  think I can stop 
	calling, and I don't think I can 
	stand it either.  How could
	you leave it on the machine like 
	that, for all our friends to hear?



43.  EXT.  SCULLY'S PHONE BOOTH - NIGHT

		SCULLY
	I need a place to stay, Jen.  
	Maybe for a week.  Someplace 
	nobody will think to look for me.  
	With our history, I figure you're a 
	pretty good choice.  Plain enough?

		JENNY
	So skip  town -- you're good at that.

		SCULLY
	I got no money, baby.  Besides, 
	that's a parole violation.  And if I 
	get tagged with this summons 
	they'll feed me to the lawyers.

		JENNY
	No cash?  And what about last 
	month's acrimony check?

		SCULLY
	I can work it out.  Mop your floors, 
	dust the furniture.

		JENNY
	Forget it, Scully!  I got my own 
	space now, and it's private, 
	you understand?  

		SCULLY
	No!  What the hell does that mean?

		JENNY
	I know you don't care, but that's 
	how it is.

		SCULLY
	You're living with someone, I mean 
	that's what it means, isn't it? -- Hello!

Scully WHACKS the handset on the counter, puts it back to his ear.

	Hello?  Have we got a bad connection?

		JENNY
	Have we.

		SCULLY
	So this guy you're living with,  
	is he nice, I mean, is he a  
	sensitive guy?  Does he let you 
	have your 'space'?  That must be
	great for you, really, like having a 
	houseplant that can water itself.

		JENNY
	Actually he's an asshole, like 
	you -- I'm sure you'd like each 
	other.  Y'know maybe I should 
	move out and let you move in 
	with him.

		SCULLY
	Perfect!   Perfect!



44.  INT.  SANDRA'S SQUAT - NIGHT.

The camera pans slowly  around the room during the following 
monologue. 

		EMILY
	I know you're there Sandra, listening 
	to this, I can feel it.  And I suppose 
	you can just erase my voice off 
	the tape once I hang up, but 
	not me.  I've got your message 
	memorized now, and I can't stop
	it playing in my head.  Would 
	you like to hear it?  Sandra?
	Answer me!

The camera finishes its pan: there is nobody there.

45.  EXT.  SCULLY'S PHONE BOOTH - NIGHT

		JENNY
	You did a job on me, Jake.  Know 
	how you can break a bone and it 
	doesn't set right?  Heals wrong, 
	and they have to break it again 
	to set it properly?  I think you 
	broke my heart that way, baby.  
	Who was it you gave your number 
	when you moved?  

		SCULLY
	Jenny...you want your heart broken, 
	don't give the job to some damn 
	amateur ;  I can do it for you better.  
	Do you hear what I'm saying?  
	I need to talk to you -- just let me 
	come over so I --

		JENNY
	Forget it, Jake!

		SCULLY
	I can't talk like this, like I'm back
	in jail trying to reach through 
	those fucking glass windows on 
	their fucking toy phones.  Jenny?  
	Don't hang up on me; you're my last --   

Scully realizes he's talking to a dead line.  

	It's my last quarter.

He hangs up, then slowly starts putting all the stuff back in his 
pockets that he took out earlier.  He notices Emily.  She's 
scrunched down in her booth, sitting on the cement, smoking and 
crying quietly.  They look at each other, then look away, 
embarassed.  Scully finishes collecting his stuff, steps outside.

		SCULLY
	      (to Emily)
	Are you alright?  I couldn't help 
	noticing you here...
 
Emily pays no attention.  Scully pauses, clears his throat.

		SCULLY
	Has anyone...has anyone ever told 
	you what amazing eyes you have?
 
She laughs, a quick bark of astonishment.

		SCULLY
	No, really.  and I know eyes. I 
	studied to be an optometrist.
	Name's Scully.
  
She stubs out her cigarette on the glass of the phone booth.
   
		EMILY
	I'm gay, Scully.
 
Pause.

		SCULLY
	Well we both like women then; there's 
	something we've got in common.
 
They both laugh, at the sheer stupidity of the line. 
 
		SCULLY
	Or we both hate 'em.

They glance at each other, then away.

	Are you going to be okay?  I 
	can call you a cab.  
	        (beat)
	If you can lend me a quarter.
 
		EMILY
	There'll be a courtesy phone 
	at the bus station.  Thanks. 

She gets to her feet and walks off down the street.

		SCULLY
	Courtesy phone, that sounds 
	nice.   Like it could almost be a 	
	pleasant experience.

Scully looks around, notices Harlan has slipped down to 
something like a seated position.  He walks over, squats beside 
Harlan, gives him a shake and a light slap.  No response.  Scully 
goes through Harlan's pockets, finding a pack of cigarettes, 
extracts one and lights up.  Maria appears, wearing a pair of dark 
glasses, approaches Scully. 

		MARIA
	Spare a smoke, man?  

Scully looks at her warily.  Maria flips up her glasses for a moment.


		MARIA
	Hey, chief, it's me.  You live 
	three extra days, y'know, every 
	one of those you give away.

Scully gives in, offers her the pack.  She chooses carefully, as 
though they weren't all identical, and tears off the filter. 

		SCULLY
	That must cost a few extra days.   

Maria lights the cigarette  with extravagant care.

		MARIA
	Most of the toxins are in the filters.
	They don't tell you that.  All
	I want is the pure poison.

Scully starts walking away up the line of booths.  Maria follows.
 
		MARIA
	Hey, Ace!  Where you heading?

		SCULLY
	I dunno.   I got nowhere to go.

He can't find a joke in it.  They fall into step.
 
		SCULLY
	They gonna hunt me down and 
	fuck me up.

		MARIA  
	They after you too?  

 		SCULLY  
	Who they?  They who?
 
		MARIA
	You should try poverty.  It's the 
	best urban camoflauge. 
 
		SCULLY
	Right.

		MARIA  
	Be poor, Eddy.  Nobody in this city looks 
	at you if you're poor.  Ask somebody for
	money and they'll pretend they
	can't even see you.  Here -- check 
	out how you look in my coat.  Go
	on -- I'll trade ya.

		SCULLY  
	This jacket cost me 30 bucks!

Still, he takes it off, and Maria helps him on with her coat, pretends 
to brush lint off the shoulders.

		MARIA  
	Big spender.  Go ahead, try it on.  
	See?  Already you look like Mr.  
	Nobody.  Try the hat.

		SCULLY
	Fuck the hat, and fuck this 
	bullshit swindle!  Gimme
	back my jacket.

		MARIA
	So it's bullshit?  So tell me 
	what I look like.

Maria is behind him at this point.  Scully starts to turn to face her, 
but she scrambles to stay out of his line-of-sight.

		MARIA
	No, no, don't turn around.  Just
	tell me what I look like.

		SCULLY
	For a start, you're wearing my
	goddamn jacket!

		MARIA
	Not what I'm wearing.  What I 
	look like.

Scully starts to turn again, and she grabs him by the back of the 
coat so she can stay behind him.

		MARIA
	I'm telling you man, don't you
	fucking turn around!   Tell me
	some thing, one thing.  What
	colour eyes?

		SCULLY
	Jesus Christ.

		MARIA
	What colour!

		SCULLY
	You know, I think my last 
	girfriend dumped me because
	I got the eyes wrong?  Why do
	you all think the eyes are so
	fucking important?

`		MARIA
	Why do cops wear dark glasses?

		SCULLY
	I don't know...

		MARIA
	Why is it easier to lie over the
	telephone?

		SCULLY
	...I don't know what colour your
	eyes are.  I don't even remember
	the colour of my own, anymore.
	I used to...I used to know.

Maria lets him go.

		MARIA
	They're blue.

Cautiously, Scully turns to face her.  Maria lets him.

		SCULLY
	I think you're right.

		MARIA
	But you be poor awhile, that
	should wash them right out.  
	Eyes the colour of concrete, 
	Francis, eyes the colour of spit. 
	You'll never be found.  Go
	ahead -- you try on the hat. 

END. 



Home Page
More About Marlboro City